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Taxation, Virtual Currency and Blockchain

The O'Quinn Law Library collection now includes Taxation, Virtual Currency and Blockchain by Aleksandra Bal.

Taxation, Virtual Currency and Blockchain is primarily a policy anaysis of the tax treatment of virtual currency transactions, but it also goes into some depth reviewing judicial decisions related to this topic.  Researchers looking for a bibliography of relevant cases and government papers might be interested in this book's review of the major publications addressing American and European law.  While primarity written for practitioners already familiar with the basic concepts, each chapter includes an introduction to the concepts that would make this book valuable to law students as well (even concepts like "income tax," not just concepts involving new technology).

Taxation, Virtual Currency and Blockchain is is currently available on the New Books shelf at the far end of the law library reference desk.  This book's call number is K 4487.E43B35 2019.

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