"Nota Bene" means "note this well" or "take particular notice." We at the O'Quinn Law Library will be posting tips on legal research techniques and resources, developments in the world of legal information, happenings at the Law Library, and legal news reports that deserve your particular attention. We look forward to sharing our thoughts and findings and to hearing from you.

N.B: Make a note to visit "Nota Bene" regularly.

-Spencer L. Simons, former Director, O'Quinn Law Library and Associate Professor of Law



Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Law Library of Congress Provides Online Access to Older US Treaties


The Law Library of Congress now provides free, online access to Treaties and Other International Agreements of The United States of America, a publication compiled by Charles Bevans.  The 13 volumes in this set include bilateral and multilateral treaties signed by the United States from 1776 to 1949. The set also includes a general index to help in locating relevant treaties.  

The Law Library of Congress is also currently working to digitize treaties from 1950 to 1984, while newer treaties can be found on the US Department of State website.

To access the treaties, visit the Law Library of Congress website. 

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Fall 2016-Brown Bag Presentation Series

Each semester the law library presents a series of presentations covering legal research topics. These presentations are held at 12 noon on Tuesdays and Wednesdays and will take place in Room 115 BLB (except for Federal Administrative Law Research on Wednesday, October 12, which will be held in 113 BLB). We will be offering the following sessions for the Fall 2016 semester (click here for more details):

1. Federal Legislative Research
Tuesday, 9/27, Wednesday, 9/28
Robert Clark, Reference and Research Librarian

2. Power Searching on Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law
Tuesday, 10/4, Wednesday, 10/5
Katy Badeaux, Reference and Research Librarian

3. Federal Administrative Law Research
Tuesday, 10/11, Wednesday, 10/12
Dan Donahue, International and Foreign Law Librarian

4. Empirical Legal Research
Tuesday, 10/18, Wednesday, 10/19
Mon Yin Lung, Associate Director of the Law Library

5. Advanced Databases Search Strategies
Tuesday, 10/25, Wednesday, 10/26
Emily Lawson, Reference and Research Librarian

Friday, September 9, 2016

Finding Information on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement

You may have read in the news that the United States and China recently ratified the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But what exactly does the agreement say, and how many nations must ratify it before it goes into effect? The United Nations provides answers to these questions online, along with the full text of the agreement itself (available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, and Russian).

For some historical context, as well as a helpful summary that isn’t written in legalese, you might also want to check out this report from the Congressional Research Service: Climate Change: Frequently Asked Questions about the 2015 Paris Agreement. The report explains the agreement’s requirements and recommendations, the ratification process, and the relationship of the agreement to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.   

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) has issued lots of useful reports on climate change. Here are links to a few of them:
To find more, see our previous blog post entitled Finding CRS Reports.