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Showing posts from December, 2011

Nota Bene numbers for 2011

Blogging can be a lonely business, especially when the audience is unknown or undetermined.A blogger tries her or his best to write something meaningful (at least to a certain group of people), yet one may never know how the audience reacts.The bloggers at Nota Bene surely have our moments of uncertainty.But judging from the numbers, 2011 has been a very encouraging year.Below are some figures from Blogger’s statistics:

Total pageviews since the beginning, as of 7 p.m., 12/31/2011: 22,099
Total pageviews of 2011, as of 7 p.m., 12/31/2011: 17,633
Total posts in 2011: 103
Total bloggers in 2011: 8
Top ten viewing countries: U.S., Russia, Germany, France, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Canada, Latvia, Netherlands, and Australia.

As the person starting this blog, I first want to thank my fellow bloggers—reference and research librarians in the University of Houston O’Quinn Law Library.They are great colleagues in many ways. The second entity I should give thanks is Blogger.com, which hosts Nota Bene…

Google Scholar Citations

A recent announcement on the Google Scholar Blog indicates that the company has now made Google Scholar Citations available for all. Google Scholar Citations is a free tool that allows authors to track citations to their articles and compute citation metrics. It provides overall citation information as well as information about citations in the last five years.

Once you provide your name and affiliation, Google Scholar will search for possible articles authored by you. False hits can be deleted easily from the list, while omitted articles can be added as well. In addition, multiple versions of the same article can be merged into one listing. You can also set up an alert to receive an email when a newly published article cites one of your articles. Initially profiles are private, but you can choose to make your information available to the public. Public profiles can be searched, allowing you to locate information about co-authors and other scholars in your area of expertise. To lear…

Voter ID Laws

As focus on the 2012 election gains momentum, there is also growing attention on the issue of voter identification laws. These laws require people to show ID, or sometimes photo ID, before they are allowed to vote at the polls. There is a great deal of debate about this issue as some argue that these measures are meant to limit the right to vote for particular groups, while others maintain that these laws are necessary to curb voter fraud. In the last few years, voter ID laws have been enacted or introduced in a growing number of states, including Texas. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures website, in 2011 only three states (Oregon, Vermont, and Wyoming) did not have voter ID laws or consider voter ID legislation.

For information about specific requirements in each state, see the map and chart provided by the National Conference of State Legislatures website. The Brennan Center for Justice has also put together a report detailing the large number of voting …

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