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Nota Bene numbers for 2011

Blogging can be a lonely business, especially when the audience is unknown or undetermined. A blogger tries her or his best to write something meaningful (at least to a certain group of people), yet one may never know how the audience reacts. The bloggers at Nota Bene surely have our moments of uncertainty. But judging from the numbers, 2011 has been a very encouraging year. Below are some figures from Blogger’s statistics:


Total pageviews since the beginning, as of 7 p.m., 12/31/2011: 22,099


Total pageviews of 2011, as of 7 p.m., 12/31/2011: 17,633


Total posts in 2011: 103


Total bloggers in 2011: 8


Top ten viewing countries: U.S., Russia, Germany, France, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Canada, Latvia, Netherlands, and Australia.



As the person starting this blog, I first want to thank my fellow bloggers—reference and research librarians in the University of Houston O’Quinn Law Library. They are great colleagues in many ways. The second entity I should give thanks is Blogger.com, which hosts Nota Bene. But the biggest THANK YOU goes to our viewers (many of them our students). Thank you for viewing our blog. We will do our best to bring you useful information in 2012.





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