"Nota Bene" means "note this well" or "take particular notice." We at the O'Quinn Law Library will be posting tips on legal research techniques and resources, developments in the world of legal information, happenings at the Law Library, and legal news reports that deserve your particular attention. We look forward to sharing our thoughts and findings and to hearing from you.

N.B: Make a note to visit "Nota Bene" regularly.

-Spencer L. Simons, former Director, O'Quinn Law Library and Associate Professor of Law



Sunday, November 13, 2016

Now Available: Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture, & Law

The Law Library’s subscription to HeinOnline now includes a new resource in its collection of over fifty resource groups for primary and secondary legal sources: Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture, & Law. This collection brings together a vast array of legal content and materials related to slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery. 

Beyond these primary legal materials the collection every English-language legal commentary on slavery published before 1920 and more than a thousand pamphlets and books on slavery from the 19th century. The collection also word searchable access to all Congressional debates from the Continental Congress to 1880 along with many modern histories of slavery. 

Edited by Paul Finkelman, an expert on slavery and American legal history, the collection identifies his picks with gold stars. Clicking on the star will open an in-depth explanation of the title’s significance. The 1836 title Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans, by Lydia Maria Child, is marked for its significance as a landmark of abolitionist literature created by American women. The collection is expected to grow continually, with both new scholarship and from additional historical material discovered. 

Blog readers who do not have full access to HeinOnline as Law Center community members may still explore the vast array of content in the Slavery in America and the World, at no cost, courtesy of Hein. Any interested reader may register for access here. There is no cost to register, but Hein asks registrants to consider making a donation to NAACP, the United Negro College Fund, or another charity of the user's choice which supports civil rights, equality, or the advancement of people of color. Making a donation is voluntary, and is not required to access the database. Be sure to check out this amazing collection today. 

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