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-Spencer L. Simons, former Director, O'Quinn Law Library and Associate Professor of Law



Friday, April 24, 2015

Texas State Symbols and Capitals


This week, the Texas House Committee on Culture, Recreation, and Tourism considered several resolutions regarding new official state symbols and capitals.  For instance, resolutions have been introduced to designate the cowboy hat as the official state hat of Texas, Hico as the official steak capital of Texas, “the Lone Star State” as the official nickname of Texas, and #Texas as the official hashtag of Texas. 

For over one hundred years, the legislature has been designating certain things as state symbols.  In 1901, the legislature designated the bluebonnet as the official state flower and the practice has gained momentum over time.  Now Texas has an official amphibian (Texas toad), footwear (cowboy boot), musical instrument (guitar), pie (pecan), vehicle (chuck wagon), and more.   Since the 1980s, the legislature has also been designating certain cities and counties as official capitals.  Anahuac is the Alligator Capital of Texas, Lockhart is the Barbecue Capital, Caldwell is the Kolache Capital, and Fredericksburg is the Polka Capital.  Approximately 70 cities and counties have been designated state capitals.  

For a full list, see the Texas State Library and Archives Commission websites for Texas State Symbols and Official Capital Designations.

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