Skip to main content

Don't Panic, It's Exam Time!

Law school exams are right around the corner, and there are lots of resources available to help you prepare. This short guide includes just a few these items.

Remember law students, you will survive your law school exams- don’t panic!

UHLC students can search past exams by course name or professor name at http://www.law.uh.edu/student/. You will need your cougarnet username and password to gain access. Taking an old exam can be a great way to prepare, and it is especially helpful to go over your answers with a study group, so you can use each other’s knowledge to fill in gaps.

Also at http://www.law.uh.edu/student/ there are exam tips from Tamsen Valoir. These tips are especially good for preparing for essay exams.

 The O’Quinn Law Library also has a number of books about preparing for exams, many are listed below. If you are looking for a study guide for a specific course, ask a reference librarian, we will be happy to show you what’s available in that subject area.

Ann M. Burkhart & Robert A. Stein, Law school success in a nutshell : a guide to studying law and taking law school exams (2008).
KF283.B871x 2008, Law Reference & Reserves

Charles R. Calleros, Law School Exams: Preparing and Writing to Win (2007).
KF283.C35 2007, Law Reserves

Suzanne Darrow-Kleinhaus, Mastering the law school exam : a practical blueprint for preparing and taking law school exams (2007).
KF283.D37 2007, Law Reserves

John C. Dernbach, Writing essay exams to succeed (not just to survive) (2007).
KF283.D47 2007, Law Stacks

John C. Dernbach, A practical guide to writing law school essay exams (2001).
KF283.D47 2001, Law Reserves

Barry Friedman, John C.P. Goldberg, Open book : succeeding on exams from the first day of law school (2011).
KF283.F75 2011, Law Stacks

Finally, I’ll include some wisdom from the internet crowds. These links all feature advice on law school exams, from professors and others. But remember, always listen and take to heart what your professor has said about taking their exam, he or she will be the one assigning your grade in the end.

Daniel Solove, Concurring Opinions, Law School Exam-Taking Tips 

Jeff Lipshaw, Legal Profession Blog, Beyond IRAC: Law School Exam Taking Tips 

Evan Shaeffer’s Legal Underground, A Law Professor Shares The Top Arbitrary Number (Turns Out to be Six) of Things Not to Do on Law School Exams 

Law Student Blog, How to Prepare for Law School Exams 

Douglas Whaley, Law School Exam Strategy: 30 Tips for Before, During, and After the Exam 

Best of luck!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Spying and International Law

With increasing numbers of foreign governments officially objecting to now-widely publicized U.S. espionage activities, the topic of the legality of these activities has been raised both by the target governments and by the many news organizations reporting on the issue.For those interested in better understanding this controversy by learning more about international laws concerning espionage, here are some legal resources that may be useful.

The following is a list of multinational treaties relevant to spies and espionage:
Brussels Declaration concerning the Laws and Customs of War (1874).Although never ratified by the nations that drafted it, this declaration is one of the earliest modern examples of an international attempt to codify the laws of war.Articles 19-22 address the identification and treatment of spies during wartime.These articles served mainly to distinguish active spies from soldiers and former spies, and provided no protections for spies captured in the act.The Hagu…

Citing to Vernon's Texas Codes Annotated: Finding Accurate Publication Dates (without touching a book)

When citing to a current statute, both the Bluebook (rule 12.3.2) and Greenbook (rule 10.1.1) require a  practitioner to provide the publication date of the bound volume in which the cited code section appears. For example, let's cite to the codified statute section that prohibits Texans from hunting or selling bats, living or dead. Note, however, you may remove or hunt a bat that is inside or on a building occupied by people. The statute is silent as to Batman, who for his own safety, best stay in Gotham City.
This section of the Texas Parks and Wildlife code is 63.101. "Protection of Bats." After checking the pocket part and finding no updates in the supplement, my citation will be:
Tex. Parks & Wild. Code Ann. § 63.101 (West ___ ). When I look at the statute in my bound volume of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Code, I can clearly see that the volume's publication date is 2002. But, when I find the same citation on Westlaw or LexisNexis, all I can see is that the …