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Don't Panic, It's Exam Time!

Law school exams are right around the corner, and there are lots of resources available to help you prepare. This short guide includes just a few these items.

Remember law students, you will survive your law school exams- don’t panic!

UHLC students can search past exams by course name or professor name at http://www.law.uh.edu/student/. You will need your cougarnet username and password to gain access. Taking an old exam can be a great way to prepare, and it is especially helpful to go over your answers with a study group, so you can use each other’s knowledge to fill in gaps.

Also at http://www.law.uh.edu/student/ there are exam tips from Tamsen Valoir. These tips are especially good for preparing for essay exams.

 The O’Quinn Law Library also has a number of books about preparing for exams, many are listed below. If you are looking for a study guide for a specific course, ask a reference librarian, we will be happy to show you what’s available in that subject area.

Ann M. Burkhart & Robert A. Stein, Law school success in a nutshell : a guide to studying law and taking law school exams (2008).
KF283.B871x 2008, Law Reference & Reserves

Charles R. Calleros, Law School Exams: Preparing and Writing to Win (2007).
KF283.C35 2007, Law Reserves

Suzanne Darrow-Kleinhaus, Mastering the law school exam : a practical blueprint for preparing and taking law school exams (2007).
KF283.D37 2007, Law Reserves

John C. Dernbach, Writing essay exams to succeed (not just to survive) (2007).
KF283.D47 2007, Law Stacks

John C. Dernbach, A practical guide to writing law school essay exams (2001).
KF283.D47 2001, Law Reserves

Barry Friedman, John C.P. Goldberg, Open book : succeeding on exams from the first day of law school (2011).
KF283.F75 2011, Law Stacks

Finally, I’ll include some wisdom from the internet crowds. These links all feature advice on law school exams, from professors and others. But remember, always listen and take to heart what your professor has said about taking their exam, he or she will be the one assigning your grade in the end.

Daniel Solove, Concurring Opinions, Law School Exam-Taking Tips 

Jeff Lipshaw, Legal Profession Blog, Beyond IRAC: Law School Exam Taking Tips 

Evan Shaeffer’s Legal Underground, A Law Professor Shares The Top Arbitrary Number (Turns Out to be Six) of Things Not to Do on Law School Exams 

Law Student Blog, How to Prepare for Law School Exams 

Douglas Whaley, Law School Exam Strategy: 30 Tips for Before, During, and After the Exam 

Best of luck!

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