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Law School Success Guides


As a new academic year begins, some of you may have a number of questions about how to successfully navigate law school.  Whether you are a 1L looking for tips about how to outline, a 2L beginning work on a law journal, or a 3L starting to think about the bar exam, the library has a number of books to help you better prepare for the year ahead and beyond.  With insights from lawyers, law professors, and law students themselves, these resources include: 

1000 Days to the Bar, but the Practice of Law Begins Now by Dennis J. Tonsing - KF272.T66 2010

Coming to Law School: How to Prepare Yourself for the Next Three Years by Ian Gallacher - KF283.G35 2010

Hard-Nosed Advice from a Cranky Law Professor: How to Succeed in Law School by Austen L. Parrish and Cristina C. Knolton - KF283.P37 2010

Law School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Law School Experience: By students, For Students by Robert H. Miller - KF283.M55 2004 (Reserves)

Law School Labyrinth : A Guide to Making the Most of Your Legal Education by Steven R. Sedberry - KF283.S43 2009

Law School Success in a Nutshell : A Guide to Studying Law and Taking Law School Exams by Ann M. Burkhart and Robert A. Stein - KF283.B871x 2008 (Reference and Reserves)

Law School Survival Manual : From LSAT to Bar Exam by Nancy B. Rapoport and Jeffrey D. Van Niel - KF283.R37 2010

The International Student's Survival Guide to Law School in the United States: Everything You Need to Succeed by Rachel Gader-Shafran - KF283.G33 2003

What the L? : 25 Things We Wish We'd Known Before Going to Law School by Kelsey May, Samantha Roberts, and Elizabeth Shelton - KF283.M388 2010

A Woman's Guide to Law School: Everything You Need to Know to Survive and Succeed in Law School by Linda R. Hirshman - KF283.H57 1999   

If you have any questions about these, and other helpful library resources, please stop by the reference desk and ask a librarian.

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