"Nota Bene" means "note this well" or "take particular notice." We at the O'Quinn Law Library will be posting tips on legal research techniques and resources, developments in the world of legal information, happenings at the Law Library, and legal news reports that deserve your particular attention. We look forward to sharing our thoughts and findings and to hearing from you.

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-Spencer L. Simons, former Director, O'Quinn Law Library and Associate Professor of Law



Thursday, July 26, 2012

Sources for Roman Law

Recently, a previous blog post on Nota Bene dated November 17, 2011 and entitled “This Week in Legal History – Justinian the Great” has received some discussion among members of the University of Houston Law Center community.  This insightful post introduces the Corpus Iuris Civilis and provides direction for further reading concerning Justinian and his law code.

The term “Roman law” refers to the legal system which developed in ancient Rome between the adoption of the Twelve Tables by the Roman Senate in 449 B.C. and the promulgation of the Corpus Iuris Civilis by Justinian in A.D. 529.  The development of Roman law comprises almost a thousand years of jurisprudence--from the Twelve Tables to the Corpus Iuris Civilis.  Roman law served as a basis for legal practice in some parts of continental Europe until A.D. 1453.

For studies on Roman law in general held by the O’Quinn Law Library, please see:
  • Bever, Thomas. A Discourse on the Study of Jurisprudence and the Civil Law: Being an Introduction to a Course of Lectures. South Hackensack, N.J.: Rothman Reprints, 1964. (K235.B48 1964)
  • Dyck, Andrew R. A Commentary on Cicero, De Legibus. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004. (PA6296.D323 D93 2004)
  • Harries, Jill. Cicero and the Jurists: From Citizen’s Law to the Lawful State. London: Duckworth, 2006. (KJA2147.H37 2006)
  • Hunter, William Alexander. Introduction to Roman Law. 9th ed. rev. London: Sweet & Maxwell, Ltd., 1934. (KJA147.H86 1934)
  • Mancini, Anna. Ancient Roman Solutions to Modern Legal Issues: The Example of Patent Law. New York: Buenos Books America, 2004. (K1505.M35 2004)
  • Nicholas, Barry. An Introduction to Roman Law. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962. (KJA147.N52 1962)

1 comment:

  1. The development of Roman law comprises almost a thousand years of jurisprudence--from the Twelve Tables to the Corpus Iuris Civilis. lawyers

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